ON THE COVER

 

COMMEMORATIVE ISSUE  2002 - 2017
 
15 years of reporting on the maritime industry
 

 

COMMEMORATIVE ISSUE  2002 - 2017
 
15 years of reporting on the maritime industry
 
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Contents

 

FROM THE BRIDGE:

THE COMMANDER:  Commander Tsietsi Mokhele pushed the maritime agenda and championed the potential of the industry. It would be disrespectful to applaud the government's recent interest in the blue economy without a nod in his direction. We asked him a few questions about his involvement in addressing seablindness in South Africa and whether he was still involved in the maritime space.

STATURE AND PRESENCE: Prof Malek Pourzanjani is calmly going about his business as the first appointed CEO of the South African International Maritime Institute (SAIMI).  It is an interesting position to be in, as he necessarily has to lead the establishment and prove the viability of the entity while it s being formally established within the South African maritime industry. Editor, Colleen Jacka, caught up with him over a cup of coffee in the Mother City.

A MARITIME NATION? Dumisani Ntuli, Acting Chief Director: Maritime Transport Policy and Legislation at the Department of Transport asks and answers the question of whether South Africa can be considered a maritime nation.

MARITIME SPATIAL PLANNING Management of ocean space has traditionally been carried out through sectoral approaches, and in many cases this has led to conflict amongst sectors, or between sectors and the need to protect the marine environment. As the demand for ocean space and marine resources in South Africa increases, a more integrated and coordinated approach to management is required to ensure that ecological, economic and social objectives are balanced. Marine spatial planning (MSP) has emerged in many countries to date as an effective process to achieve greater integration of marine resource management and policy.


ON THE RADAR: 

PEOPLE TO WATCH:

  • Aubrey Sosibo
  • Pinky Zungu
  • Abongile Makumsha
  • Farhana Ismail
  • Peter Lamb
  • Khomotjo Mphahlele
  • Kevin Flanagan
  • Nomkhitha Mdeni
  • Yvette de Klerk
  • Leon Mouton
  • Leon Eugene Govender
  • Wilna Kapp
  • Malibongwe Ndlozi
  • Margaret Balingile Masuku
  • Bokamoso Molale and Thamsanqa Hoza
  • Sboniso Mwandla

THE BLUE ECONOMY:

MARINE TOURISMWith its lengthy coastline, sunny climate and scenic beauty South Africa should be the ultimate marine tourism destination, but the country's tourism message has focused more game drives and land-based animals. It's time for a new campaign to establish the country as one with unparalleled marine experiences. Natalie Janse investigates the South African marine tourism industry; its role in the Blue Economy and the influence of Operation Phakisa.  

SMALL HARBOUR DEVELOPMENT:  Recognition is now gaining momentum regarding the significant role that small harbours could play in the socia-economic development of the ares in which they are located. This recognition, however has been a long time coming. Some 20 years ago when, in response to the generally unsafe and deteriorated state of these harbours, the DPW initiated the Repair and Maintenance Programme RAMP) but little seems to have changed sincethen.    

SETTING THE LIMITS:  From racing across massive swells to deliver stores and harrowing boarding attempts via ladders onto mammoth vessels - to the transport of dead bodies, miscalculations that have seen incidents and injuries and even allegations of bribery - there are certainly sufficient plot lines in the Off Ports Limits (OPL) market to create a thoroughly absorbing mini series. It's a market that can easily become over-traded; where costs are high and where clients can be fickle as well as very price conscious. But the South African OPL sector is fully functional, highly competitive and willing to define the limits of what can be delivered via small and medium-based launches to meet the needs of the passing ships and their crews. 


FISHING

A FISHING CRISIS:  No more than 10 minutes into this year's FishSA conference, Claire Attwood heard the words 'crisis" for the first time. She uses the conference to gauge the status quo of the fishing industry in South Africa.   

FISHERIES MANAGEMENT:  South African fishing policy evolution since 2001 has generally attempted to carefiully balance economic stability; ecologically responsible resource management and social transformation. A just, equitable and sustainable fishing dispensation in a developmental state, and especially one with a history such as South Africa's, was always going to be fraught with problems. Shaheen Moolla gets to grips with the false starts, competing interests and historic distortions as he traces developments over the last 15 years.  

AT THE END OF THE LINE:  Many traditional fishers were not recognised and accommodated in past fishing right allocation processes. This has led to animosity amongst fishers in traditional fishing communities whose survival is dependent on traditional small scale fishing operations in the nearshore. Mark Botha visits the plight of the small scale fishers who pioneered the origins of a commercial fishing industry in South Africa.

AQUACULTURE COMES OF AGE:  Significant government support for aquaculture sector development and investment, rising consumer demand for local and sustainable seafood, and a shift to a value-chain-driven growth strategy are key factors that have combined to create a competitive advantage and signal the coming of age of South African aquaculture. Peter Britz and Samantha Venter investigate market driven aquaculture growth. 


MARINE ENGINEERING

THESE ARE THE SHIPS THAT SA BUILT:  Brian Ingpen wanders through the history of the South African shipbuilding industry. The establishment of the boatbuilding industry was the logical product of the early Dutch craftsmen who repaired the hulls, masts and yards of East Indiamen's vessels that had been battered by the frequent gales and wild seas off the coast. Indeed, the boatyards in Cape Town, and most of the fishing centres, built hundreds of typical Cape fishing boats over the years.    


SAFETY AND SECURITY:

EMERGENCY RESPONSE:  South Africa is alive with many people and companies who have the necessary skills as well as expertise to deal with ships that are in difficulty when travelling through our waters and along our most treacherous coast. It is, therfore, imperative that under Operation Phakisa we continue to seize opportunities that present themselves to our industry.

CYBER SECURITY:  As an industry that is highly dependent on computer systems, process, people and technology; the shipping industry is vulnerable to cyber security threats that threaten to disrupt the transort of  goods to every corner of the world valued at trillions of dollars.

 

 

FROM THE BRIDGE:

THE COMMANDER:  Commander Tsietsi Mokhele pushed the maritime agenda and championed the potential of the industry. It would be disrespectful to applaud the government's recent interest in the blue economy without a nod in his direction. We asked him a few questions about his involvement in addressing seablindness in South Africa and whether he was still involved in the maritime space.

STATURE AND PRESENCE: Prof Malek Pourzanjani is calmly going about his business as the first appointed CEO of the South African International Maritime Institute (SAIMI).  It is an interesting position to be in, as he necessarily has to lead the establishment and prove the viability of the entity while it s being formally established within the South African maritime industry. Editor, Colleen Jacka, caught up with him over a cup of coffee in the Mother City.

A MARITIME NATION? Dumisani Ntuli, Acting Chief Director: Maritime Transport Policy and Legislation at the Department of Transport asks and answers the question of whether South Africa can be considered a maritime nation.

MARITIME SPATIAL PLANNING Management of ocean space has traditionally been carried out through sectoral approaches, and in many cases this has led to conflict amongst sectors, or between sectors and the need to protect the marine environment. As the demand for ocean space and marine resources in South Africa increases, a more integrated and coordinated approach to management is required to ensure that ecological, economic and social objectives are balanced. Marine spatial planning (MSP) has emerged in many countries to date as an effective process to achieve greater integration of marine resource management and policy.


ON THE RADAR: 

PEOPLE TO WATCH:

  • Aubrey Sosibo
  • Pinky Zungu
  • Abongile Makumsha
  • Farhana Ismail
  • Peter Lamb
  • Khomotjo Mphahlele
  • Kevin Flanagan
  • Nomkhitha Mdeni
  • Yvette de Klerk
  • Leon Mouton
  • Leon Eugene Govender
  • Wilna Kapp
  • Malibongwe Ndlozi
  • Margaret Balingile Masuku
  • Bokamoso Molale and Thamsanqa Hoza
  • Sboniso Mwandla

THE BLUE ECONOMY:

MARINE TOURISMWith its lengthy coastline, sunny climate and scenic beauty South Africa should be the ultimate marine tourism destination, but the country's tourism message has focused more game drives and land-based animals. It's time for a new campaign to establish the country as one with unparalleled marine experiences. Natalie Janse investigates the South African marine tourism industry; its role in the Blue Economy and the influence of Operation Phakisa.  

SMALL HARBOUR DEVELOPMENT:  Recognition is now gaining momentum regarding the significant role that small harbours could play in the socia-economic development of the ares in which they are located. This recognition, however has been a long time coming. Some 20 years ago when, in response to the generally unsafe and deteriorated state of these harbours, the DPW initiated the Repair and Maintenance Programme RAMP) but little seems to have changed sincethen.    

SETTING THE LIMITS:  From racing across massive swells to deliver stores and harrowing boarding attempts via ladders onto mammoth vessels - to the transport of dead bodies, miscalculations that have seen incidents and injuries and even allegations of bribery - there are certainly sufficient plot lines in the Off Ports Limits (OPL) market to create a thoroughly absorbing mini series. It's a market that can easily become over-traded; where costs are high and where clients can be fickle as well as very price conscious. But the South African OPL sector is fully functional, highly competitive and willing to define the limits of what can be delivered via small and medium-based launches to meet the needs of the passing ships and their crews. 


FISHING

A FISHING CRISIS:  No more than 10 minutes into this year's FishSA conference, Claire Attwood heard the words 'crisis" for the first time. She uses the conference to gauge the status quo of the fishing industry in South Africa.   

FISHERIES MANAGEMENT:  South African fishing policy evolution since 2001 has generally attempted to carefiully balance economic stability; ecologically responsible resource management and social transformation. A just, equitable and sustainable fishing dispensation in a developmental state, and especially one with a history such as South Africa's, was always going to be fraught with problems. Shaheen Moolla gets to grips with the false starts, competing interests and historic distortions as he traces developments over the last 15 years.  

AT THE END OF THE LINE:  Many traditional fishers were not recognised and accommodated in past fishing right allocation processes. This has led to animosity amongst fishers in traditional fishing communities whose survival is dependent on traditional small scale fishing operations in the nearshore. Mark Botha visits the plight of the small scale fishers who pioneered the origins of a commercial fishing industry in South Africa.

AQUACULTURE COMES OF AGE:  Significant government support for aquaculture sector development and investment, rising consumer demand for local and sustainable seafood, and a shift to a value-chain-driven growth strategy are key factors that have combined to create a competitive advantage and signal the coming of age of South African aquaculture. Peter Britz and Samantha Venter investigate market driven aquaculture growth. 


MARINE ENGINEERING

THESE ARE THE SHIPS THAT SA BUILT:  Brian Ingpen wanders through the history of the South African shipbuilding industry. The establishment of the boatbuilding industry was the logical product of the early Dutch craftsmen who repaired the hulls, masts and yards of East Indiamen's vessels that had been battered by the frequent gales and wild seas off the coast. Indeed, the boatyards in Cape Town, and most of the fishing centres, built hundreds of typical Cape fishing boats over the years.    


SAFETY AND SECURITY:

EMERGENCY RESPONSE:  South Africa is alive with many people and companies who have the necessary skills as well as expertise to deal with ships that are in difficulty when travelling through our waters and along our most treacherous coast. It is, therfore, imperative that under Operation Phakisa we continue to seize opportunities that present themselves to our industry.

CYBER SECURITY:  As an industry that is highly dependent on computer systems, process, people and technology; the shipping industry is vulnerable to cyber security threats that threaten to disrupt the transort of  goods to every corner of the world valued at trillions of dollars.

 

Print  

 

 

EDITOR: Colleen Jacka


Read Colleen's maritime blog at www.maritimematters.net


 

APPLAUD:

 Thank you to everyone who has contributed to the success of Maritime Review Africa over the last 15 years. We applaud your valued support and look forward to bringing you more interesting reads over the next 15 years.


 

 

 

EDITOR: Colleen Jacka


Read Colleen's maritime blog at www.maritimematters.net


 

APPLAUD:

 Thank you to everyone who has contributed to the success of Maritime Review Africa over the last 15 years. We applaud your valued support and look forward to bringing you more interesting reads over the next 15 years.